New drug could benefit traumatic brain injury patients

| Jul 25, 2014 | Brain Injury

Head injuries are typically more serious than injuries to bones and many internal organs, primarily because of brain trauma. Like other Americans, Oklahomans understand that a person who sustains brain trauma may never fully recover. A person can remain paralyzed, have difficulties with speech or suffer memory loss. People with brain injuries can only hope that medical science will find ways to successfully treat them.

Fortunately, there has been good news recently for brain injury patients. A new medication known as tranexamic acid will be tested in another state. The drug has already been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The Department of Defense has been using it to treat injuries in which bleeding is a problem, and experts now plan to test whether TXA can control or stop bleeding in the brain. According to one physician, treating a brain injury is always difficult and there have been no significant advancements in treatment for two decades. Doctors are hoping that TXA will find use in the field so that paramedics, for example, can stop intracranial bleeding before a patient even arrives at a hospital, thus preventing severe damage. The new study will start in September with 60 patients.

Any medical advancement in treating brain injuries is welcome news. For patients dealing with brain injuries, treatment regimes should be followed as directed by their physicians. Unfortunately, treatment for brain injuries can be extremely costly and financially compromise a patient’s family. However, if a patient has suffered a brain injury due to someone else’s carelessness or negligence, the patient or his or her family can file a lawsuit against the responsible party to recover compensation.

In Oklahoma, patients who have sustained brain injuries through the negligence of others can consult with experienced legal professionals to determine how best to receive compensation.

Source: CBSLocal.com, “New brain injury medication to be tested in Minn.,” Kim Johnson, July 8, 2014

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