Keep your teens safe – they are especially susceptible to car crashes

On Behalf of | Mar 23, 2022 | Auto Accident Injuries, Car Accidents

It’s difficult for parents to trust their teenage children enough to let them drive by themselves. Statistics show that there are several key factors that make teenage car crashes – and injury – much more likely. By taking proactive steps, you can make it much less likely that your teen will be the cause of a potentially devastating accident.

Teen passengers increase the risk tremendously

When teenage drivers have other teenagers in the car, their risk of getting into an accident increases considerably with each additional passenger. This is likely because teenage passengers are much more likely to distract the driver, and the driver is more likely to take risky maneuvers in order to impress their friends.

Whenever possible, it’s a good idea to limit the number of teen passengers your child is allowed to take in their car when you are not with them.

Teens are susceptible to drinking and driving

Close to one quarter of all fatal teen crashes involve alcohol. A combination of peer pressure from friends and an inexperience with alcohol can lead teens to underestimate their level of impairment and overestimate their ability to drive safely. Educate your teen on the effects of alcohol on a driver’s reflexes and judgment, as well as on the consequences of driving while impaired.

Many teens don’t wear seatbelts

Statistics show that 46% of teens involved in car accidents in 2019 were not wearing seatbelts. This number is alarmingly high, especially when you consider that seatbelts drastically reduce the likelihood of death or serious injury in an accident. Make sure that your teen understands the risks involved with driving without a seatbelt.

One of the most difficult parts of being a parent is allowing your teen to transition into adulthood safely. By making and enforcing certain safety rules, you can help them to avoid unnecessary risks when they get behind the wheel.

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